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College of Communication & Creative Arts - Writing Arts

Rowan University

Course Offerings

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Click above for our alternate Writing Arts course offerings website!

Effective for students entering in fall 2013 and later (last edited 9/25/13)
Total Hours Required for Graduation in the Writing Arts Major = 77 credits

NOTE 1: To graduate, students must have at least 120 credits; at least a 2.5 in required, specialization and elements of language courses combined; at least a C- in each required, subspecialty, and elements of language course; and a 2.0 overall.
NOTE 2: Only 9 credits from other institutions may transfer into the required, subspecialty, and elements of language areas.
NOTE 3: Prerequisites are in parentheses ( ).



 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS (19 credits)

 

INTRODUCTORY LEVEL COURSES (9 credits)

WA 07200 Introduction to Writing Arts (CCII)

Introduction to Writing Arts familiarizes students with the disciplinary underpinnings of Writing Arts, providing a background in the history of writing, current writing theories, writing as technology, and the writing professions. The course covers these issues within the context of the Writing Arts major, enabling students to situate themselves in a community of writers and language professionals and preparing them for upper-level coursework.

CMS 04250 Communication Theory (CCII)

This sophomore-level course acquaints students with current theories and perspectives as they apply to a variety of communication environments. Drawing upon a wealth of timely research, students study theories relating to interpersonal, small group, organizational, public, and mass communication. The course presents theories in model-form and through readings, as well as extensive class discussion.

Choose One:
WA 07290 Creative Writing I (CC1) 

This course concentrates on developing students' skills in writing various kinds of poems and in developing fiction techniques. In addition to exploring different poetic forms, students learn how to create characters, establish conflict, and develop a plot while writing a short story. Students examine the work of professional poets and fiction writers.
OR:
WA 07309 Writing Children’s Stories (30 credits) 

This course focuses on fiction written for juveniles and young adults. Students examine the rich variety of literature published for young people. They do exercises, write complete stories, critique each other's writing in workshops and meet with the teacher for individual conferences on their work. They also learn how to submit manuscripts to magazine and book publishers.

 

ADVANCED LEVEL COURSES (6 credits)

WA 01300 The Writer’s Mind (CCII and 45 credits)

The Writer’s Mind increases students’ understanding of themselves as writers by learning craft-specific approaches to writing, and by developing critical awareness of their own and others’ writing. Working in different genres of writing, students will gain experience in effective revision strategies, in analyzing audience, and in visual aspects of the printed or electronic page.

WA 01301 Writing, Research, & Technology (CCII, 60 credits, and completion of or concurrent enrollment in Introduction to Writing Arts)

This course presents the rhetorical, social, and practical dimensions of writing and researching in networked contexts. Students focus both on the roles an individual creates and maintains when writing for different cybermedia formats and the kinds of conventions that exist in systems like the World Wide Web, listservs, e-mail, and hypertext. A web-based research project in a concentrated area of writing for a particular electronic community demonstrates students' ability to communicate on line.

 

SENIOR LEVEL CAPSTONE COURSES (4 credits)

WA 01405 Senior Seminar: Evaluating Writing (CCII, Intro to Writing Arts and 90 credits)

This course examines issues and methods of assessing writing. Students will explore a wide variety of tools used to evaluate writing, such as portfolio and holistic assessment, and they will discuss the validity and reliability of many assessment models.

WA 01450 Writing Arts Portfolio Seminar [1 credit] (Writer’s Mind; Writing, Research, & Technology; and completion of OR enrollment in Evaluating Writing)

Seniors majoring in Writing Arts will have an opportunity to reflect on the work undertaken as part of the writing arts major. The course asks students to construct and submit a portfolio consisting of work products both from those courses included in the core and from a selection of courses in the required elective clusters. A written reflection on the intellectual and learning experience derived from these courses as evidenced by the items included comprises the written requirement for this course.

 

Writing Specialization (12 credits)


You must choose 12 credits from any of the courses listed below. If you choose all 12 credits from one of the three specializations, that specialization will appear on your transcript. If you complete more than one specialization, you must take at least nine separate credits in each specialization. See www.rowan.edu/wa for advice on shaping the specialization.

Creative Writing (P641)

WA 07290 Creative Writing I (CC1) 

This course concentrates on developing students' skills in writing various kinds of poems and in developing fiction techniques. In addition to exploring different poetic forms, students learn how to create characters, establish conflict, and develop a plot while writing a short story. Students examine the work of professional poets and fiction writers.

OR (not the one chosen in required courses):

WA 07309 Writing Children’s Stories (30 credits) 

This course focuses on fiction written for juveniles and young adults. Students examine the rich variety of literature published for young people. They do exercises, write complete stories, critique each other's writing in workshops and meet with the teacher for individual conferences on their work. They also learn how to submit manuscripts to magazine and book publishers.

WA 07291 Creative Writing II (Creative Writing I) 

Building upon the foundations learned in Creative Writing I, students in Creative Writing II will engage in more specific practice in the conventions of short story writing, creative nonfiction and poetry. Students will have directed assignments encouraging experimentation in multiple genres but will prepare a final portfolio that may give more emphasis to a genre of their choice. Special emphasis will be placed on reading examples of these conventions and learning how writers graft or borrow techniques (dialogue, dramatic monologue, voice, description) from one genre to apply it in another.

WA 07391 Writing Fiction (Creative Writing I or II) 

This class will provide a forum for students to explore the strategies fiction writers use in creative expression, especially in writing the short story. Students will develop an analytical vocabulary that allows them to read, interpret, and evaluate the work of other fiction writers. A major portion of the class will be given over to workshop sessions, where students can share and evaluate each other's work. Students will also become familiar with a body of published short stories that illustrate techniques of expression such as setting, point of view, characterization, dialogue, and other elements of fiction.

WA 07395 Writing Poetry (Creative Writing I or II) 

This class will provide a forum for students to explore the strategies poets use in creative expression. The students will develop an analytical vocabulary that allows them to read, interpret, and evaluate the work of other poets. A major portion of the class will be given over to workshop sessions, where students can share and evaluate each other's work. Students will also become familiar with a body of published poetry that illustrates techniques of expression such as imagery, metaphor, voice, tone, the music and strategy of the line, and other elements of poetry.

WA 07392 Fundamentals of Playwriting (Creative Writing II or Instructor Permission)

This course covers the methods of developing and writing a play. During the course, students analyze plays, and outline and work on the draft of a full-length play. This course may not be offered annually.

WA 01304 Writing with Style (CCII, 45 credits)

Emphasizing prose style, this course builds upon the skills of organization and development covered in College Composition I and II. It gives special attention to tone, diction, sentence structure, audience, and ultimately, to the evolution of a personal voice. Students write frequently, receive instructor and peer feedback, and learn to analyze and edit both professional and non-professional essays.

WA 07410 Tutoring Writing
This course provides students theory and practice in turoring writing at all educational levels. It covers the writing process, the particulars of the tutorial relationship and issues of working with writers from a variety of backgrounds and abilities. It is recommended for students who are presently engaged in the tutoring of writing and those who may teach writing in one-on-one or small-group settings in the future.

WA 01370 Professions in Writing Arts [1 credit] (Introduction to Writing Arts and 30 credits)
Professions in Writing Arts: Post-Graduate Options introduces students to the various and wide-ranging opportunities available to writing arts students by exploring career, graduate school and other professional options in the field of writing. Class topics may include statements of purpose and letters of application; internships, field experience, and volunteerism; and publishing opportunities. Professionalism and entrepreneurial approaches to job seeking are also emphasized. Discussions and workshops are supplemented by guest speakers and readings.

JRN 02322 The Publishing Industry (Spring semester 45 credits)
The Publishing Industry examines the business and practice of publishing through broad readings and research related to industry operations and trends, field trips, guest speakers, interactive projects, and directed discussion. Students explore publishing aspects of books, magazines, newspapers, online material, blogging, podcasting, self-publishing, and editing. When students complete this course, they will have a better idea of the career path they would like to pursue.

RTF 03393 Film Scenario Writing (45 credits)

The course covers the basic technical requirements for writing movie scripts and the problems of adapting material to screen and script analysis. By viewing contemporary movies and studying plotting, point-of-view, character creation and dialogue, students learn how a film script is put together and write an original script.

Internship or Research Practicum (Please see below for course descriptions.)

 

Technical and Professional Writing (P643)

WA 01302 Intro to Technical Writing
This course introduces students to both the field of technical writing and the uses of technical writing within a variety of professions. Students will learn how technical writers use document design strategies based on rhetorical principles to respond to communication challenges. Through practice with a variety of genres, students will gain experience with audience analysis, communication ethics, research, collaboration, professional style, and editing. The course culminates in a writing project based on a professional, academic, or community issue of the student's choosing. Students are encouraged, and will be assisted, in designing projects that reflect their professional interests.

WA 01400 Writing for the Workplace (75 credits) 

Writing for the Workplace gives students practice in the writing activities common to most careers. Assignments include resumes and cover letters, field and progress reports, abstracts of professional articles, and proposals. Students can also expect to deliver one or two brief oral presentations. The course is restricted to juniors and seniors.

WA 07410 Tutoring Writing

This course provides students theory and practice in tutoring writing at all educational levels. It covers the writing process, the particulars of the tutorial relationship and issues of working with writers from a variety of backgrounds and abilities. It is recommended for students who are presently engaged in the tutoring of writing and those who may teach writing in one-on-one or small-group settings in the future.

WA 01370 Professions in Writing Arts [1 credit] (Introduction to Writing Arts and 30 credits)
Professions in Writing Arts: Post-Graduate Options introduces students to the various and wide-ranging opportunities available to writing arts students by exploring career, graduate school and other professional options in the field of writing. Class topics may include statements of purpose and letters of application; internships, field experience, and volunteerism; and publishing opportunities. Professionalism and entrepreneurial approaches to job seeking are also emphasized. Discussions and workshops are supplemented by guest speakers and readings.

CMS 04290 Rhetorical Theory (CCII) 

Rhetorical Theory introduces students to the concept of rhetoric and how it has been theorized from antiquity to the present. The course provides students with a systematic history of rhetorical theory and spotlights significant theorists such as Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Blair and Burke. Students will explore how both ancient and contemporary theories of rhetoric apply to contemporary society.

JRN 02322 The Publishing Industry (Spring semester, 45 credits)
The Publishing Industry examines the business and practice of publishing through broad readings and research related to industry operations and trends, field trips, guest speakers, interactive projects, and directed discussion. Students explore publishing aspects of books, magazines, newspapers, online material, blogging, podcasting, self-publishing, and editing. When students complete this course, they will have a better idea of the career path they would like to pursue.

RTF 03295 Introduction to New Media (CCII)
Introduction to New Media surveys emerging digital communication and entertainment media and teaches new media from the perspective of the producer. Students will discuss the evolution, social and historical implications, and production of media forms with an emphasis on social networking, user generated and other web media.

Internship or Research Practicum (Please see below for course descriptions.)

 

New Media Writing and Publishing (P642)

WA 01400 Writing for the Workplace (75 credits) 

Writing for the Workplace gives students practice in the writing activities common to most careers. Assignments include resumes and cover letters, field and progress reports, abstracts of professional articles, and proposals. Students can also expect to deliver one or two brief oral presentations. The course is restricted to juniors and seniors.

WA 01370 Professions in Writing Arts [1 credit] (Introduction to Writing Arts and 30 credits)
Professions in Writing Arts: Post-Graduate Options introduces students to the various and wide-ranging opportunities available to writing arts students by exploring career, graduate school and other professional options in the field of writing. Class topics may include statements of purpose and letters of application; internships, field experience, and volunteerism; and publishing opportunities. Professionalism and entrepreneurial approaches to job seeking are also emphasized. Discussions and workshops are supplemented by guest speakers and readings.

CMS 04315 Participatory Media (CC II)
This course examines the social, economic and political implications of the use of participatory media, which enable audience participation in the production of mediated messages. Students taking this course will study network theory, the historical roots of the participatory culture, collective action and social networking, convergence, and the changing modes of media production. Students will also study legal and social justice issues related to these evolving trends in media use.

CMS 04215 Fiction to Film (30 credits) 

This course provides comparative study of film and literature. Students learn the critical vocabulary of literature and film and enhance their understanding of both art forms. The course covers American and foreign works.

JRN 02314 Photojournalism
(45 credits)
This course covers the practices and techniques used by photojournalists on modern American newspapers. Students take digital photographs and edit in Photoshop. Weekly laboratory assignments are required. 


JRN 02317 Publication Layout and Design (45 credits)
This course focuses on design, layout and make-up of brochures, magazine and newspaper pages, newsletters, and advertisements. It stresses how to coordinate art and typography with content. A workshop approach is used to show students how creativity in design can increase the effectiveness of communication. Students learn how to work with the QuarkXPress program on the Macintosh computers to achieve effective layout.

JRN 02321 Online Journalism I
 (JRN 02205 or PR 06301)

This course examines the online news landscape. Students learn which principles of traditional journalism can and should be applied to writing online news, and which should not. Students explore how to write news in ways that leverage the unique aspects of the online environment.
See course syllabus and the professor's blog, tutorials, and more at http://markberkeygerard.com.

JRN 02322 The Publishing Industry (Spring semester 45 credits)
The Publishing Industry examines the business and practice of publishing through broad readings and research related to industry operations and trends, field trips, guest speakers, interactive projects, and directed discussion. Students explore publishing aspects of books, magazines, newspapers, online material, blogging, podcasting, self-publishing, and editing. When students complete this course, they will have a better idea of the career path they would like to pursue.

JRN 02335 Media Law (45 credits)
This course examines laws that deal with the legal responsibilities of print, broadcast, and film media as well as public relations and advertising practitioners. Students analyze topics such as libel, privacy, broadcast regulations and copyright.

RTF 03275 Applied Media Aesthetics: Sight, Sound and Story
(CCII and 30 credits)
This course offers students an introduction to the aesthetic concepts as applied directly to radio, television, and film media. Using examples from these media, students will study, discuss, and analyze design and composition elements as they apply to the production process. A basic vocabulary of aesthetic terminology will be assembled and students will be responsible for understanding and applying those terms through various written and visual assignments. 
3.000 Credit hours

RTF 03295 Introduction to New Media (CCII)
Introduction to New Media surveys emerging digital communication and entertainment media and teaches new media from the perspective of the producer. Students will discuss the evolution, social and historical implications, and production of media forms with an emphasis on social networking, user generated and other web media.

Internship or Research Practicum (Please see below for course descriptions.)

 

Elements of Language (3 credits)

CMS 04325 Linguistics

Students study the nature of human language by examining four major components: phonology, semantics, syntax, morphology. Linguistics principally emphasizes linguistic universals, characteristics which all human languages share. Students also discuss dialect formation, first-language acquisition in children, animal communication systems, and compare modern linguistic theories.

CMS 04225 Semantics (30 credits)
This course makes students aware of the relationship between language and human behavior and of the use and abuse of verbal and non-verbal language. It emphasizes meaning, the classification and abstraction processes and the application of semantic principles to the language of literature, politics, advertising, and prejudice.

ENGL 02301 American English Grammar
This course emphasizes traditional grammar and seeks to give the student a practical understanding of the structure of contemporary American English grammar. Procedures include lecture, class discussion, and the working out of grammatical problems, including sentence diagramming.

ANTH 02250 Intro to Anthropological Linguistics
Students in this interdisciplinary course will engage in the scientific study of language with particular reference to the relationships among the languages, thoughts, and cultures of speech communities living all over the world, including within the United States, France, India, Canada, Spain, Japan and Peru, among others. Additional course topics include the process of human language acquisition, structures of human language, bilingualism and the ways in which race, class, gender, and other social characteristics may be displayed through the use of language. This course is offered every other year, beginning in 2009.

Completion of second semester of 200 level foreign language.

 

OTHER WRITING ARTS COURSES
WA 01311 Research Practicum in Writing Arts I
(75 credits)

Students apply the theories and methodology learned in Writing Arts courses to a research mentorship with a member of the department faculty. Students keep a detailed log of working hours, prepare a portfolio representative of their practicum experience, write an analytical critique of the practicum, and are evaluated by their faculty mentor as well as the practicum supervisor. May be taken concurrently with WA 01312 and/or WA 01313.

WA 01312 Research Practicum in Writing Arts II (75 credits)

Students apply the theories and methodology learned in Writing Arts courses to a research mentorship with a member of the department faculty. Students keep a detailed log of working hours, prepare a portfolio representative of their practicum experience, write an analytical critique of the practicum, and are evaluated by their faculty mentor as well as the practicum supervisor. May be taken concurrently with WA 01311 and/or WA 01313.

WA 01313 Research Practicum in Writing Arts III (75 credits)

Students apply the theories and methodology learned in Writing Arts courses to a research mentorship with a member of the department faculty. Students keep a detailed log of working hours, prepare a portfolio representative of their practicum experience, write an analytical critique of the practicum, and are evaluated by their faculty mentor as well as the practicum supervisor. May be taken concurrently with WA 01311 and/or WA 01312.

WA 01320 Internship I in Writing Arts
Under professional supervision in the field, students practice theories and skills learned in the classroom. Students keep a detailed log of working hours, prepare an extensive portfolio, write an analytical critique of the practicum, and are evaluated by their faculty supervisor.

WA 01321 Internship II in Writing Arts (Internship I in Writing Arts)

Under professional supervision in the field, students practice theories and skills learned in the classroom. Students keep a detailed log of working hours, prepare an extensive portfolio, write an analytical critique of the practicum, and are evaluated by their faculty supervisor.

WA 01410 Independent Study in Writing Arts Program
This course provides students with an opportunity to work independently on specialized topics under the guidance of a faculty member. Generally, this course can not be substituted for any course offered by a department in the College of Communication & Creative Arts. Permissions are needed from the Department Chair and the Dean.

 

Free Electives (43 credits)

Other Department of Writing Arts Requirements
(All but one of these requirements can be completed by distributing them among the Gen Ed/non-program elective requirements. A free elective needs to be used to fulfill the final one.)

• Total of 3 Math/Science courses

• Total of 4 History, Humanities & Language courses, one of which must be a history or a philosophy course.
• Total of 4 Social and Behavioral Science courses, one of which must be a sociology course and one of which must be a psychology course.

Creative Writing Concentration

 

New Media Concentration

 

For students still under the requirements of the old major (prior to fall 2013), please refer to the following Prezi: