Unit Plan

Othello on Trial
Eileen Clark
Lindenwold High School
May 18, 2011

Unit Summary:

After reading the Play “Othello”, the students will work with another class and another school to put Othello on trial. The students will each be assigned different roles from the play as well as from the courtroom; bailiff, judge, attorney, etc…, as well as the camera people, giving the students an opportunity to be a part of the project without having to have a speaking part.  As part of the project, the students will make glogsters, participate in web chatting through Today’s Meet, and even have the opportunity to connect with another school not only through Today’s Meet, but WebEx as well.

Primary Interdisciplinary Connections:

The students will be working with their History classes on trial procedures, and read the play in their English Classes.  Students who have video production classes will be using their skills as cameramen/women.

  Unit Rationale:
Students will read about the consequences - personal, social, and political - of arrogance and greed for power. The reading of modern works that thematically support the theme will show students the relevance of these themes in the modern world.

Learning Targets:

 Standards:
CCSI: English Language Arts 6–12, CCSI: Grades 11-12, Reading: Literature

1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain
2.  Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.
Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed). 
3.   Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)
4.   Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).
5.   Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)
CCSI: English Language Arts 6–12, CCSI: Grades 11-12, Reading: Informational Text
6.   Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
7.  Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.
8.     Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem
9.   Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to   interact and collaborate with others.
 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

Unit Essential Questions:
1. Why not just take what we want and grab whatever we can in this selfish world?
2. Can we achieve our ambitions and maintain our morality?
3. Is it possible to see the consequences of our actions when we are acting out of selfishness?
4. How can we achieve our dreams without greed and arrogance?

Unit Enduring Understandings:
Students will understand that:
1. Ruthless ambition and arrogance lead to self-destruction.
2. We can achieve our ambitions and dreams without sacrificing our morality if our dreams are the right ones and our methods are proper and true.
3. Selfishness can cause us to be blind to the consequences our actions have on others as well as ourselves.
4. Striving for the greater good can help to balance our desires with the consequences of our actions.

Learning Targets:
The students will learn how to read and analyze a tragedy.
Understand that consequences are the results of our behaviors.
Students will read and translate selected passages.
Students will write a creative and/or informal writing piece.
Students will recognize and know vocabulary in context and from study.
Students will identify the causes and effects within the reading.

Evidence of Learning:
Students will be graded based on the following: class participation, writing assignments, group work, quizzes and tests, and a final project; the trial.  This will take approximately 6-8 weeks; therefore there will be weekly assessments to monitor what the students are learning along the way.

Equipment Needed:
Smart Board
Smart Response
Laptops
Flip Camera
Document Camera

Teacher Resources:
You Tube
No Fear Shakespeare
Various Internet Resources

Formative Assessments:
Project Rubric
Holistic Writing Rubric
Teacher-made Assessments

                                                   Lesson 1:  Introducing “Othello”

21st Century Themes:

21st Century Skills:
Students will be able to:
Read and translate selected passages.
Recognize and know vocabulary in context and from study.
Identify the causes and effects within the reading.
Goals and Objectives:
Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
  Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)
Learning Activities:
1.  Show video clip on discrimination; http://youtu.be/A7VbzzfMAuc
2.  In groups, have students discuss and make connections to the different discriminations shown in
video, then share with the class.
3.  Show video clip of “O” trailer (modern version of Othello)
4.  Have students discuss what discrimination they might see in “Othello” based on the clip seen.
5.  Exit card:  Write one sentence explaining how discrimination can affect someone.
This lesson will begin with the showing of the first video clip, after which the students will pair off and discuss what they saw.  They will share with the class any connections they made before the clip of the “O” movie trailer is shown.  After the trailer is shown, the students will discuss what types of discrimination they might read about in “Othello” based on what they saw.  Before the class ends, the students are to write one sentence explaining how discrimination can affect someone, which will be collected as they leave.  The video clips draw the students in, and they find a lot to discuss.  Making connections helps to keep their interest.

                                                               Lesson 2:  Character Sketch

21st Century Themes:

21st Century Skills:
Students will be able to:
Read and translate selected passages.
Write a creative and/or informal writing piece.
Recognize and know vocabulary in context and from study.
Goals and Objectives:
Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.
Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
 Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
Use appropriate and varied transitions and syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary, and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic.
Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic
Learning Activities:
1.  Have students write a brief description of a character without using their name.
2.  Read the descriptions to see how well they did; discuss        
3.  Introduce a graphic organizer which helps the student break down the character into  
different specifics; ie…  personality, physical features, etc…
4.  Allow students to work in groups to fill in graphic organizer (groups based on character of choice).
5.  Exit Card:  How does a graphic organizer help with your writing?
Formal Assessment:   
Final Product: Character Sketch (Will take approximately 5 days to complete, breaking it down per
day per part; ie… physical- one day, personality-one day, etc…)

      This lesson will begin with a warm-up in which the students will write a description of a character of their choice without using their name.  Once they are done (give 5 minutes), put the description up on the Smart Board with the use of the document camera, and have the students guess who the character is.  After each one, discuss the description; what was good, and how to make it better.  Once the characters have been shown, present the students with a graphic organizer which will help them to become more descriptive in their writing as it separates into specific categories, and helps students to put more thought into what they are writing.  This process will take a few days before you can get a rough draft, then an end result. The students share with each other as they go along, and help each other to become descriptive with the characters they choose.  They stay interested because they are sharing with each other, and almost find themselves challenging each other to become the “expet” on their character.

                                                     Lesson 3: Putting the pieces together

 

21st Century Themes:

21st Century Skills:
Students will be able to:
Read and translate selected passages.
Recognize and know vocabulary in context and from study.
Identify the causes and effects within the reading.
Goals and Objectives:
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.
Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.
Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.
Learning Activities:
1.  Hand students baggies with small puzzles in it. (Have the puzzles mixed up with others, and/or with missing pieces)  Have students pair off and try to put the puzzles together.  Students will realize that there are missing pieces and wrong pieces in their bags, and will go around trying to find the right pieces they need to put the puzzles together.
2.  Once the puzzles are together, discuss with the students what happened, what they just did.  Ask how that would relate to the play that they are reading. ( If there is no response, ask more direct questions such as, do we know…?)
3.  Discuss what has been read so far to determine what they already know, and what they need to know to put the story together to make sense.
4.  Read to the end of the specific act that you have been working on.
5.  Exit Card: