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Curriculum Processes and Proposal Guidelines

This page provides information on the current curriculum processes and guidelines for proposals.

The curriculum process and forms have changed for the 2014/2015 academic year. Please review all the information below and on the Curriculum Home Page before submitting a proposal. If you have any questions, Contact your College Curriculum Chair or the Senate Curriculum Chair

Submitting Proposals and Deadlines (New)

2014/2015 Submission Dates (New PDF Submission Requirement)

  • Fall 2014 Submission Deadline: Friday, October 31, 2014 (Noon)
  • Spring 2015 Submission Deadline: Friday February 20, 2015 (Noon)

Sponsors need to submit a hard copy of the proposal to the Senate office and submit a complete, single (PDF) file via email by the submission deadline. The hard copy and the PDF file must be complete and include the Process Submission form and all necessary supplemental documents.

The email address to submit the PDF version of the proposal is curriculumproposalsubmission@rowan.edu The proposal should be submitted (emailed) by its lead sponsor and title of the proposal should be the subject line of the email.

NOTE: This email address is only for the submission (or resubmission, should revisions be needed) of curriculum proposals. If the proposal is revised the complete proposal file (PDF) must be resubmitted. Query/discussion emails should be sent directly to the chair of the Senate Curriculum Committee (Erin Herberg: herberg@rowan.edu) or to the Senate Office Secretary (Linda Daley: daley@rowan.edu).

Curriculum Processes and Guidelines

Process A

Creation of any new course or changes to any existing course(s). Only one new course can be created per Process A, but an unlimited number of courses can be changed. Process A proposals modifying existing courses should be organized logically and, if necessary, submitted by program or by type of change.

New course proposals require a completed Library Resource Form. Proposals also need to address how the course complements and supports the program’s formal, stated learning goals (referring to the relevant goals/outcomes on the program’s assessment grid). If special course designation is being requested for the course, the proposal must explicitly address how the course meets the defined criteria:

Proposals for new courses and changes to existing courses may require a program change proposal (Process C or D) and in some instances the logical preparation of these proposals might be to include changes to existing courses in a Process C or D proposal. Process A proposals require a College Curriculum Committee hearing, but not a Senate Curriculum Committee hearing. They are reviewed by the Curriculum Committee Chair, and once approved, are forwarded to the Provost’s Office and announced as approved to the Full Senate.

Proposal Samples may not reflect the most recent changes to the curriculum processes and guidelines. Where there are discrepancies, follow the guidelines.

Process B

Creation of, or changes to an existing, General Education designated course. Only one General Education course can be created or changed per proposal.

New General Education course proposals require a completed Library Resource Form. Proposals for new General Education Courses (or requesting General Education designation for existing non-General Education courses) must explicitly identify why/how the course qualifies for the requested designation. See current Bank Goals

If a special course designation is requested, the proposal must explicitly address how the course meets the defined criteria:

Process B proposals require College Curriculum Committee hearing and a Senate Curriculum Committee hearing. If approved, they are forwarded to the Provost’s Office and announced as approved to the Full Senate.

Proposal Samples may not reflect the most recent changes to the curriculum processes and guidelines. Where there are discrepancies, follow the guidelines.

Process C

Minor changes (three or fewer) to an existing, single degree or non-degree program (does not include changes to courses—see Process A--unless the most logical way to present changes to existing courses and resultant changes to the program is to include them in the program change proposal). A Process C may be required for related new course proposals (Process A’s) if the new courses change program degree or non-degree requirements. No more than three changes to a program can be included in a Process C proposal. If more than three total changes are being made to a degree or non-degree program in the same curriculum cycle (semester), a Major Change, Process D proposal must be submitted.

Process C proposals require a College Curriculum Committee hearing, but not a Senate Curriculum Committee hearing. They are reviewed by the Senate Curriculum Committee Chair, and once approved, are forwarded to the Provost’s Office and announced as approved to the Full Senate.

Proposal Samples may not reflect the most recent changes to the curriculum processes and guidelines. Where there are discrepancies, follow the guidelines.

Process D

Major changes (four or more) to an existing, single degree or non-degree program, including the creation of accelerated undergraduate/graduate programs. Major changes as a rule do not include changes to courses—see Process A-- unless the most logical way to present changes to existing course(s) and resultant changes to the program is to include them in the program change proposal.

Note: Sponsors of an accelerated degree program should work with the Provost’s Office and the Senate Curriculum Committee Chair to determine the appropriate proposal guidelines.

Process D proposals require College Curriculum Committee hearing and a Senate Curriculum Committee hearing. If approved, they are forwarded to the Provost’s Office and announced as approved to the Full Senate.

Proposal Samples may not reflect the most recent changes to the curriculum processes and guidelines. When in question, follow the guidelines.

Process E

Creation of a single, new non-degree program proposal (e.g., minor, specialization, concentration, certificate). Process E proposals require a completed Library Resource Form and clearly defined program goals following university established guidelines (assessment grid) for student learning goals and outcomes.

Process E proposals require College Curriculum Committee hearing, a Senate Curriculum Committee hearing, and are presented to the Full University Senate for a formal vote. If approved they are forwarded to the Provost’s office, and before final implementation must be announced to the BOT Academic Affairs subcommittee and the full BOT and (depending on the type of program) the State.

Proposal Samples may not reflect the most recent changes to the curriculum processes and guidelines. When in question, defer to the guidelines.

Process F

Creation of a single, new degree program (undergraduate or graduate). New degree programs require prior approval by the BOT Academic Affairs Subcommittee before they can be submitted as a curriculum proposal. The process for this prior approval and the creation of the required documents must be undertaken in concert with the department, the respective college Dean(s) and the Provost’s Office.

Process F proposals require a completed Library Resource Form and clearly defined program goals following university established guidelines (assessment grid) for student learning goals and outcomes.

Process F proposals require College Curriculum Committee hearing, a Senate Curriculum Committee hearing, and are presented to the Full University Senate for formal vote. If approved they are forwarded to the Provost’s office, where the proposal will be subject to additional institutional and state approval requirements.

Proposal Samples may not reflect the most recent changes to the curriculum processes and guidelines. Where there are discrepancies, follow the guidelines.

Process Q

Quasi-curricular proposals. Quasi-Curricular proposalsl generally fall into two categories. The first category are proposals those that directly or indirectly affect curriculum but do not represent curriculum in and of themselves. Examples of such proposals are those creating or dissolving a department or college; changing the name or structure of a department, school, or college; or curriculum models, definitions, or processes. The second category are those proposals that transcend identification with a single department and college, or are associated with a department or college without curricular committee representation.

Due the great variance in the purpose of a quasi-curriculum proposal, sponsors of such proposals should, in most cases, contact the Senate Curriculum Chair to determine the guidelines for presenting the proposals.

Review and approval of Process Q proposals generally begin at the first level of commonality, which might be the College Curriculum Committee level, or might be the Senate Curriculum Committee level, or even the Full Senate. All Process Q proposals are presented to the Full Senate for a formal vote and if approved are forwarded to the Provost’s Office.