Edelman Planetarium  

PUBLIC PROGRAMS  

Fall Semester 2016 

From Earth to the Universe

Sundays, 3 p.m.

Sept. 4 - Nov. 20

The night sky, both beautiful and mysterious, has been the subject of campfire stories, ancient myths and awe for as long as there have been people. A desire to comprehend the Universe may well be humanity’s oldest shared intellectual experience. Yet only recently have we truly begun to grasp our place in the vast cosmos. To learn about this journey of celestial discovery, from the theories of the ancient Greek astronomers to today’s grandest telescopes, we invite you to experience From Earth to the Universe.

Directed by the young Greek filmmaker Theofanis N. Matsopoulos, and featuring a sweeping soundtrack from Norwegian composer Johan B. Monell, viewers can revel in the splendour of the various worlds in the Solar System and the ferocity of the scorching Sun. From Earth to the Universe then leaves our home to take the audience out to the colourful birthplaces and burial grounds of stars, and still further out, beyond the Milky Way, to the unimaginable immensity of a myriad galaxies. Along the way, the audience will learn about the history of astronomy, the invention of the telescope, and today’s giant telescopes that allow us continue to probe ever deeper into the Universe.

Season of Light

Sundays, 3 p.m.

Dec. 4 - Dec. 11

Light up the cold dark season with a warm and bright holiday show!

Season of Light explores the reasons humans are so fascinated with lighting up our lives during the December holiday season.

This very popular show is an exploration of the astronomical meanings behind seasonal traditions, including the “Star over Bethlehem”.

 

 



Cosmic Castaways

Sundays, 3 p.m.

Jan. 8 - Apr. 9

There are places where the night sky has no constellations.

No Orion, no Big Dipper, nothing but a few lonely, far away stars and a few faint, ghostly patches of light. Most stars lie within the crowded boundaries of galaxies, travelling with their brothers and sisters in a vast galactic family. But some find themselves on their own, deep within voids between the galaxies. These are the cosmic castaways.

This show is an original production of the Ward Beecher Planetarium and is based on the research of YSU’s resident astrophysicists Dr. John Feldmeier and Dr. Patrick Durrell.


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FAMILY SHOWS! Oftentimes, our regular public shows are not well-suited for families with young children, since the movies are aimed at adults. Families with children 5-10 years of age will probably find these more suitable. These are shorter, about half an hour in length, and do not include a live presentation.

 

One final inducement for choosing the family shows: they're cheaper! Admission fees are only $2 for all attendees.

Note: each of the regular full-dome movies described above is always preceded by a live presentation of the current night sky using the SciDome digital video projection system. A live presentation is generally not included in the family shows.


FAMILY SHOW:

The Alien Who Stole Christmas

Sunday, Dec. 4, 2 p.m.

Join jolly ol’ Santa and concerned alien, Mr. Freep, as they explore the solar system’s planets and meet the Christmas Eve needs of their fictitious inhabitants.

 

 

 

 

 





FAMILY SHOW:

Secret of the Cardboard Rocket

Sunday, Feb. 5, 2 p.m.

Two children build a rocket ship out of a large cardboard box, and find that they can actually travel out to the planets. Moreover, the astronomy book they took out of the library talks to them, teaching them about the planets. After several adventures, they return to Earth with a new sense of wonder about our solar system.



FAMILY SHOW:

Zula Patrol: Under the Weather

Sunday, Mar. 5, 2 p.m.

The stalwart heroes of the Zula Patrol are on an expedition collecting samples of weather for scientist Multo's research -- using their loyal pet Gorga's ability to collect and bottle all kinds of weather. But when the Zula gang inadvertently hurts Gorga's feelings, he decides to leave Zula and find another planet to live on. Interplanetary villain Dark Truder then tricks Gorga into stealing the weather from other planets - part of his latest nefarious scheme to rule the Universe. The ZPers find out and go after him - in the process learning all about weather, both terrestrial and interplanetary.

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Admission fees for regular public shows:

$5  Adults

$3  Children

$3  Rowan students with ID

$3  Seniors over 60

Admission fees for family shows:

$2 for everyone

Note: we do not accept credit cards, Rowan cards, or RowanBucks!

Tickets for all shows go on sale half an hour before the show. We will sell up to six tickets to one person if others in her party are not present.

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Planetarium Policies

1. There is no late seating! After the show has started, we do not allow people to come in, for several reasons. (a) It's not safe: in the very dark environment, it's easy to stumble into equipment or chairs, possibly doing injury to you (and to the equipment!).  (b) It's disruptive to those who are already seated, if latecomers speak to one another, make other noises, or stand up in the way of seated people. Often latecomers don't even realize the theater is already filled with people, and don't realize how disruptive they are being.  (c) If a latecomer leaves the outer doors open, or turns on a flashlight or cell phone to light his way, it destroys the dark adaptation the seated audience has been going through for several minutes.

2. For the same reasons, the doors lock on the way out. If you must leave the theater for any reason, you won't be able to re-enter. Hey, the shows aren't THAT long! And the rest rooms are available before the show!

3. We strongly discourage attendance by children under six years of age, except at family shows. Such youngsters often do not react well to the dark planetarium environment and the theatrical nature of most shows. For many shows we don't recommend bringing children less than 8 or even 10 years old, though we will allow slightly younger visitors. We do a variety of shows for children on school field trips during the week: once a week we like to give adults a chance to see a show peacefullly!

 

We strongly suggest that, if your child is likely not to enjoy one of the adult shows, you consider bringing him or her to one of our family shows instead.

4. We suggest you do not get up and walk around during a show, for the same reasons mentioned in number 1. If it's an emergency, we'll tell you that rest rooms are located at the top of the stairs outside the theater; but remember that the doors lock, so you won't be able to get back in. If you're tempted to block the outer door open, we'll ask again: PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE do not open both doors at the same time! This lets bright light into a theater full of people whose eyes were adapted to very dark conditions: bright light can be almost painful, and it takes several minutes for everyone's eyes to recover their dark adaptation.

5. Please don't open any food or drink, including water. Our theater is one of the nicest-looking on the East Coast, and we want to keep it that way.

6. Like most theaters, we ask that you shut down your cell phone. In most theaters, the main problem is noise during the performance. In the planetarium, however, the problem is LIGHT! Cell phones cast light up onto the dome, destroying the illusion of the night sky we're trying to create. YOU won't notice it, because you're looking downwards; but your neighbors will get annoyed, probably at the planetarium presenter, when they see a moving blob of light on the dome.

7. The most important rule: you're not allowed to go to sleep during a show...


(Updated 11/9/2016)