Counseling & Psychological Services

For Faculty & Staff

Location
The Wellness Center
Winans Hall
201 Mullica Hill Rd.
Glassboro, NJ 08028
Phone: 856-256-4333
Fax: 856-256-4427

Office Hours
8:00am to 6:00pm
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday

8:00am to 8:00pm Wednesday

8:00am to 4:00 pm
Friday

Emergencies During Office Hours
Visit the Wellness Center and ask to speak with someone immediately

After Hours Emergencies
Call Public Safety at
256-4911 and ask for Counselor on Call


Keeping Appointments
We ask that you please contact the Wellness Center in advance to cancel appointments you are unable to attend, so that the appointment might be made available for another student.

Information for Men & Boys

Anorexia Nervosa in Males
Anorexia nervosa is a severe, life-threatening disorder in which the individual refuses to maintain a minimally normal body weight, is intensely afraid of gaining weight, and exhibits a significant distortion in the perception of the shape or size of his body, as well as dissatisfaction with his body shape and size.


Behavioral Characteristics:

  • Excessive dieting, fasting, restricted diet
  • Food rituals
  • Preoccupation with body building, weight lifting, or muscle toning
  • Compulsive exercise
  • Difficulty eating with others, lying about eating
  • Frequently weighing self
  • Preoccupation with food
  • Focus on certain body parts; e.g., buttocks, thighs, stomach
  • Disgust with body size or shape
  • Distortion of body size; i.e., feels fat even though others tell him he is already very thin

Emotional and Mental Characteristics:

  • Intense fear of becoming fat or gaining weight
  • Depression
  • Social isolation
  • Strong need to be in control
  • Rigid, inflexible thinking, “all or nothing”
  • Decreased interest in sex or fears around sex
  • Possible conflict over gender identity or sexual orientation
  • Low sense of self worth -- uses weight as a measure of worth
  • Difficulty expressing feelings
  • Perfectionistic -- strives to be the neatest, thinnest, smartest, etc.
  • Difficulty thinking clearly or concentrating
  • Irritability, denial -- believes others are overreacting to his low weight or caloric restriction
  • Insomnia

Physical Characteristics:

  • Low body weight (15% or more below what is expected for age, height, activity level)
  • Lack of energy, fatigue
  • Muscular weakness
  • Decreased balance, unsteady gait
  • Lowered body temperature, blood pressure, pulse rate
  • Tingling in hands and feet
  • Thinning hair or hair loss
  • Lanugo (downy growth of body hair)
  • Heart arrhythmia
  • Lowered testosterone levels

Binge Eating Disorders in Males

Binge eating disorder is a severe, life-threatening disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of compulsive overeating or binge eating. In binge eating disorder, the purging to prevent weight gain that is characteristic of bulimia nervosa is absent.

Behavioral Characteristics:

  • Recurrent episodes of binge eating
  • Eating much more rapidly than normal
  • A sense of lack of control over eating during binge episodes
  • Eating large amounts of food when not feeling physically hungry
  • Hoarding food
  • Hiding food and eating in secret; e.g., eating alone or in the car, hiding wrappers
  • Eating until feeling uncomfortably full
  • Eating throughout the day with no planned mealtimes

Emotional and Mental Characteristics:

  •  Feelings of disgust, guilt, or depression during and after overeating
  • Binge eating often triggered by uncomfortable feelings such as anger, anxiety, or shame
  • Binge eating used as a means of relieving tension, or to “numb” feelings
  • Rigid, inflexible “all or nothing” thinking
  • Strong need to be in control
  • Difficulty expressing feelings and needs
  • Perfectionistic
  • Works hard to please others
  • Avoids conflict, tries to “keep the peace”
  • Disgust about body size, often teased about their body while growing up
  • Feelings of worthlessness
  • Social isolation
  • Depression
  • Moodiness and irritability

Physical Characteristics:

  • Heart and blood pressure problems
  • Joint problems
  • Abnormal blood-sugar levels
  • Fatigue
  • Difficulty walking or engaging in physical activities

Bulimia Nervosa in Males

Bulimia nervosa is a severe, life-threatening disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of binge eating
followed by self-induced vomiting or other purging methods (e.g., laxatives, diuretics, excessive exercise,
fasting) to prevent weight gain. An individual struggling with bulimia is intensely afraid of gaining weight and
exhibits persistent dissatisfaction with his body and appearance, as well as a significant distortion in the
perception of the size or shape of his body.

Behavioral Characteristics:


  • Recurrent episodes of binge eating: eating an amount of food that is definitely larger than most people would eat during a similar period of time and under similar circumstances
  • A sense of lack of control over eating during binge episodes
  • Recurrent purging or compensatory behavior to prevent weight gain: secretive self-induced vomiting, misuse of laxatives, diuretics, or fasting, compulsive exercise (possibly including excessive running, body building, or weight lifting)
  • Hoarding of food, hiding food and eating in secret
  • Frequently weighing self
  • Preoccupation with food
  • Focus on certain body parts; e.g., buttocks, thighs, stomach
  • Disgust with body size or shape
  • Distortion of body size; i.e., feels fat even though he may be thin

Emotional and Mental Characteristics:

  • Intense fear of becoming fat or gaining weight
  • Performance and appearance oriented
  • Works hard to please others
  • Depression
  • Social isolation
  • Possible conflict over gender identity or sexual orientation
  • Strong need to be in control
  • Difficulty expressing feelings
  • Feelings of worthlessness -- uses weight, appearance, and achievement as measures of worth
  • Rigid, inflexible “all or nothing” thinking

Physical Characteristics:

  •  Weight fluctuations
  • Loss of dental enamel due to self-induced vomiting
  • Edema (fluid retention or bloating)
  • Constipation
  • Swollen salivary glands
  • Cardiac arrhythmia due to electrolyte imbalances
  • Esophageal tears, gastric rupture
  • Lack of energy, fatigue


Enhancing Male Body Image

  • Recognize that bodies come in all different sizes and shapes. There is no one “right” body size. Your body is not and should not be exactly like anyone else’s. Try to see your body as a facet of your uniqueness and individuality.
  • Focus on the qualities in yourself that you like that are not related to appearance. Spend time developing these capacities rather than letting your appearance define your identity and your worth.
  • Look critically at advertisements that push the “body building” message. Our culture emphasizes the Vshaped muscular body shape as the ideal for men. Magazines targeted at men tend to focus on articles and advertisements promoting weight lifting,body-building or muscle toning. Do you know men who have muscular, athletic bodies but who are not happy? Are there dangers in spending too much time focusing on your body? Consider giving up your goal of achieving the “perfect” male body and work at accepting your body just the way it is.
  • Remember that your body size, shape, or weight does not determine your worth as a person, or your identity as a man. In other words, you are not just your body. Expand your idea of “masculinity” to include qualities such as sensitivity, cooperation, caring, patience, having feelings, being artistic. Some men may be muscular and athletic, but these qualities in and of themselves do not make a person a “man.”
  • Find friendswho are not overly concerned with weight or appearance.
  • Be assertive with others who comment on your body. Let people know that comments on your physical appearance, either positive or negative, are not appreciated. Confront others who tease men about their bodies or who attack their masculinity by calling them names such as “sissy” or “wimp.”
  • Demonstrate respect for men who possess body types or who display personality traits that do not meet the cultural standard for masculinity; e.g., men who are slender, short, or overweight, gay men, men who dress colorfully or who enjoy traditional “non-masculine” activities such as dancing, sewing or cooking.
  • Be aware of the negative messages you tell yourself about your appearance or body. Respond to negative self-talk with an affirmation. For example, if you start giving yourself a message like, “I look gross,” substitute a positive affirmation, “I accept myself the way I am,” or “I’m a worthwhile person, fat and all.”
  • Focus on the ways in which your body serves you and enables you to participate fully in life.In other words, appreciate how your body functions rather than obsessing about its appearance. For example, appreciate that your arms enable you to hold someone you love, your thighs enable you to run, etc.
  • Aim for lifestyle mastery, rather than mastery over your body, weight, or appearance.Lifestyle mastery has to do with developing your unique gifts and potential, expressing yourself, developing meaningful relationships, learning how to solve problems, establishing goals, and contributing to life. View exercise and balanced eating as aspects of your overall approach to a life that emphasizes self-care

Research on Males and Eating Disorders


Strategies for Prevention and Early Intervention of Male Eating Disorders

(Compiled by Tom Shiltz, MS, CADCIII, Rogers Memorial Hospital, Oconomowoc, WI. Reprinted with permission. Source: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. American Psychiatric Association,1994.)

*All above information was obtained from National Eating Disorders Association's website at http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org