Research at Rowan University Stratford

Science Building

Improving the health of individuals and communities begins with research. The academic departments at the School of Osteopathic Medicine consist of dedicated clinical and biomedical scientists with expertise in diverse disciplines.
Faculty-driven research in Stratford encompasses social, behavioral, clinical, and basic sciences and occurs at several sites on the campus. The New Jersey Institute for Successful Aging (NJISA) is a multi-disciplinary research institute devoted to improving the health of the elderly. The CARES Institute is a nationally-recognized center for the study of child abuse and prevention.

The Science Center houses over twenty independent basic science laboratories conducting research in biochemistry, cell biology, molecular biology, genetics and physiology. These research programs are sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the American Cancer Society and many other public and private entities. In addition, the Rowan University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences integrates research with teaching. Collaboration among students, technicians, fellows, and faculty create a exciting environment for innovation and discovery.

 

Summer Medical Research Fellowship (SMRF) Program 2015

The Dean of the Rowan School of Osteopathic Medicine (SOM) will once again support the Summer Medical Research Fellowship (SMRF) Program. SOM medical students who are selected to participate receive a stipend to work for eight (8) weeks with an SOM faculty mentor on a research project. The purpose of the summer research program is to promote and facilitate education in scientific research where students participate in research activities at a professional level.


Questions about the SMRF Program can be directed to either Dr. Carl Hock (hock@rowan.edu) or Dr. Eric Moss (mosseg@rowan.edu).

SMRF 2015 Guidelines and Instructions (Adobe pdf)

SMRF 2015 Application Cover Page (Fillable Word Form)

 

 

 

Publication Highlights

  • Biswas-Fiss, EE, Affet, S., Ha, M., Biswas, S.B. Retinoid Binding Properties of Nucleotide Binding Domain 1 of the Stargardt Disease Associated ABC Transporter, ABCA4. J Biol Chem. 287, 44097-44107  PMID:23144455, 2012.
  • Cooper, K.F., Scarnati, M.S., Krasley, E., Mallory, M.J., Jin, C., Law, M.J. and Strich, R. Oxidative stress-induced nuclear to cytoplasmic relocalization is required for Not4-dependent cyclin C destruction. JCS. 125 1015-1026 PMID:22421358, 2012.
  • Fischer, J.A. and Muller-Weeks, S. Physician perceptions of the role and value of basic science knowledge in daily clinical practice. Medical Teacher. 34:744-747, 2012.
  • Guo, Y., Chen, X. and Ellis, R. E. Evolutionary Change Within a Bipotential Switch Shaped the Sperm/Oocyte Decision in Hermaphroditic Nematodes. PLoS Genet.  9: e1003850, 2013.

  • Krishnan, H., Ochoa-Alvarez, J.A., Shen, Y., Nevel, E., Lakshminarayanan, M., Williams, M.C., Ramirez, M.I., Miller, W.T., Goldberg, G.S. Serines in the Intracellular Tail of Podoplanin (PDPN) Regulate Cell Motility. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 288, 12215-1222, 2013. (published as “report” - reserved for “topics of exceptional novelty, significance and broad interest…within the top 5 percent of all articles published in the journal.”)
  • Law, M.J., Mallory MJ, Dunbrack RL Jr, Strich R.  Acetylation of the transcriptional repressor Ume6p allows efficient promoter release and timely induction of the meiotic transient transcription program in yeast. Mol Cell Biol. Feb;34(4):631-42, 2014.

  • Leone, P.A., Shera D, McPhee SWJ, Francis, J.S., Kolodny EH, Bilaniuk LT, Wang DJ, Assadi M, Goldfard O, Goldman HW, Freese A, Young D, During MJ, Samulski RJ, Janson CG.   Long-term follow-up after gene therapy for Canavan Disease.  Science Transl Med, 4(165), Dec 2012.

  • Vadla B, Kemper K, Alaimo J, Heine C, Moss, E.G. lin-28 Controls the Succession of Cell Fate Choices via Two Distinct Activities. PLoS Genet.  8(3): e1002588. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1002588, 2012.

  • Acharya NK, Levin EC, Clifford PM, Han M, Tourtellotte R, Chamberlain D, Pollaro M, Coretti NJ, Kosciuk MC, Nagele EP, Demarshall C, Freeman T, Shi Y, Guan C, Macphee CH, Wilensky RL, Nagele, R.G. Diabetes and Hypercholesterolemia Increase Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability and Brain Amyloid Deposition: Beneficial Effects of the LpPLA2 Inhibitor Darapladib. J Alzheimers Dis, 35(1): 179-98, January 2013
  • Neary, C.L. and J.G. Pastorino. Akt inhibition promotes hexokinase 2 redistribution and glucose uptake in cancer cells. J. Cell Physiol. 228:1943-1948, 2013.
  • Pestov, D.G., Shcherbik, N. Rapid cytoplasmic turnover of yeast ribosomes in response to rapamycin inhibition of TOR. Mol Cell Biol, 32(11): 2135-44, June 2012.

  • Rodriguez AR, Spur, B.W.  Total synthesis of Resolvin D1, a potent anti-inflammatory lipid mediator.  Tetrahedron Letters, 53(51): 6990-4, December 2012.

  • Wu B, Walker JA, Temmermand D, Mian K, Spur, B.W, Rodriguez A, Stein TP, Banerjee P, Yin K. Lipoxin A(4) promotes more complete inflammation resolution in sepsis compared to stable lipoxin A(4) analog. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids, 89(1): 47-53, July 2013.

  • Ringel R, Sologub M, Morozov YI, Litonin D, Cramer P, Temiakov, D. Structure of human mitochondrial RNA polymerase. Nature, 478: 269-73, October 2011.

  • Schwinghammer K, Cheung ACM, Morozov YI, Agaronyan K, Temiakov, D., Cramer P. Structure of human mitochondrial RNA polymerase elongation complex. Nat Struct Mol Biol, 20(11): 1298-303, November 2013.
  • Cares Institute
  • New Jersey Institute for Successful Aging
  • Graduate School for Biological Sciences

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