Faculty Development Online Resource Library

The Center for Teaching and Learning strives to assist SOM faculty with teaching support and professional development by providing guidance, resources, and services.

Please use the links below to peruse a wide variety of articles, tutorials and other resources for faculty. If you would like to suggest a resource or link to be added to the site, please email Elizabeth Cronin at cronine@rowan.edu

Clinical Education

Active Learning in the Clinical Education Setting

Effective Clinical Education: Strategies for Teaching Medical Students and Residents in the Office (Cayley, WMJ)

Informative journal article discusses the challenges of providing quality medical care, maintaining efficiency, and incorporating meaningful education for learners. Highlights and describe two teaching strategies, (one-minute preceptor and SNAPPS) which have been shown to improve educational processes and outcomes. Also briefly discusses two other approaches – Aunt Minnie” pattern recognition and “activated demonstration”.

SNAPPS Teaching Strategy (Practical Doc)

Provides an overview of the SNAPPS teaching strategy and includes video clips showing how to teach SNAPPS and demonstrating SNAPPS in action

The One Minute Preceptor: 5 Microskills for One-On-One Teaching (Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine)

Describes the six steps of the One-Minute Preceptor, a useful combination of proven teaching skills combined to produce a method that is very functional in the clinical setting

One Minute Preceptor (Practical Doc)

Describes the five-step microskill model, often known as the One Minute Preceptor, which provides a framework for teaching in the office or emergency room and encourages students to think critically about cases

Teaching When Time is Limited (Irby & Wilkerson, BMG)

Emphasizes the notion that teaching in small increments of time during patient care can provide powerful learning experiences for trainees. Explores the ways that clinical teachers might do this in a time efficient way. Summarizes One-Minute Preceptor, Aunt Minnie and SNAPPS models as well as activated demonstrations and case presentations.

Aunt Minnie (Grebel)

Prezi presentation highlights the steps and pro’s/con’s of using the Aunt Minnie approach to pattern recognition in the clinical setting

How to ‘Activate’ Medical Students in the Office Teaching Setting: Giving Students Permission to Be Active Learners (Taylor & Lipsky, From the column ‘For the Office-Based Teacher of Family Medicine’ in Family Medicine.)

Brief article discusses the preceptor’s role in regard to giving feedback, generalizing instruction, and promoting reflection.

Seeing Patients (University of New Mexico, School of Medicine, Office of Teacher and Educational Development)

Two-page guide offers teaching suggestions with corresponding sample questions to ask the student doctor

General Resources

APGO Effective Preceptor Modules (The 12 pamphlets in the APGO Effective Preceptor Series, written and published by the APGO Undergraduate Medical Education Committee (UMEC) provide preceptors with practical tools for teaching and evaluating students. Valuable across disciplines.)

Introduction to Preceptorship & Preceptors
The Preceptor and the Curriculum
The Preceptor and Cultural Competence
Teaching Skills for the Preceptor Learner-Centered Model
Teaching Skills for the Preceptor: Microskills Model
Asking the Difficult Questions in a Patient Encounter
What to do Before the Learners Arrive
Providing Educational Feedback
The Hidden Curriculum: What Are You Teaching

Clinical Teaching (Schwenk, University of Michigan Medical School, Center for Research on Learning and Teaching)
Discusses four factors required for successful clinical teaching and applies them to bedside teaching.

Precepting – Getting Started, Daily Activities, Bringing Closure (University of New Mexico, School of Medicine, Office of Teacher and Educational Development)

One-page guide features a checklist of suggested activities for effective Precepting

Guidebook for Clerkship Directors (Alliance for Clinical Education)

Offers 16 through chapters on roles, methods, forms and advice organized around the seven Core Competencies.

PracticalPro – Effective Clinical Teaching (Practical Doc)

Includes 5 Modules: “Preparing to Teach”, “Teaching Nuts & Bolts”, “Observations & Feedback”, “Assessment”, and “Learners in Difficulty”.

The Effective Preceptor (Davis, OUCOM/CORE)

Features a 21-slide Power Point presentation which includes checklists for Orientation, Teaching, and Providing Feedback.

The Clinician-Educator’s Handbook (Baylor College of Medicine/Texas Children’s Hospital )

Offers a 20-chapter handbook that addresses a wide variety of issues in clinical education. Individual chapters can be utilized free-standing and/or as a reference when looking for specific information.

A Guide to Clinical Performance Testing (Whitman, From IDEA Paper No. 7, Kansas State University)
Describes steps for developing an effective performance evaluation in the health professions as well as other disciplines. Addresses clarifying purposes, establishing performance goals and objectives, and several methods for measuring student performance such as checklists, anecdotal records, and observation logs.

Providing Feedback

Strategies for Giving Useful, Constructive Feedback (University of New Mexico, School of Medicine, Office of Teacher and Educational Development)

One-page guide offers suggestions for giving feedback with corresponding examples of teaching prompts and questions to ask the student doctor.

Giving Feedback (Frank, Medical College of Wisconsin)

A 22-slide Power Point presentation offers tips for preceptors on giving feedback. Identifies characteristics of effective feedback, discusses barriers to providing feedback and provides suggestions for overcoming these barriers.

Aids for Giving and Receiving Feedback (Lehner, University of California)

Offers 11 tips for better use of feedback, both as the giver and the receiver of feedback.

Guidelines for Giving Feedback (NYU School of Medicine, Macy Initiative on Health Communication)

Includes general principals and components of the feedback process.

Tips and Tutorials for the Clinical Educator/Preceptor

Teaching Nuts and Bolts (Practical Doc)

Practical guide offers an overview and tips on the following topics: Key Features Of Great Clinical Teachers; Time-efficient Teaching; Effective Questioning; One Minute Preceptor; Teaching Procedures; and Chart Stimulated Recall. Also includes information on SNAPPS, a case presentation framework.

E-Tips for Practice Education Program (Preceptor Development Initiative)

Consists of eight 10-20 minute modules, such as “Setting the Stage for Clinical Teaching”, “Fostering Clinical Reasoning”, “Giving Feedback”, “The Evaluation Process in Practice Education”, and “Supporting the Struggling Student.”

Strategies in Clinical Teaching (University of Kansas School of Medicine)
Offers eight mini-teaching modules, designed to give quick facts about clinical teaching issues. Designed to help community-based faculty be more effective teachers.

Simple Precepting Tools (OCER: Office of Community-Based Education and Research, Dartmouth Medical School)

Offers 7 informational resources in PDF form on the following topics: “How to Orient Learners to the Practice Setting Guide”, “One Minute Preceptor; Constructive Feedback”, “Introducing Learners to Patients Tips”, “Two-Minute Teaching”, “Technique for Observing the Learner”, “Five-Step Method for Teaching Clinical Skills”, and “Priming Learner for Patient Encounter”.

Preceptor Education Modules (University of Virginia’s Family Medicine Clerkship Preceptor Development Program)

Includes 7 modules on the following topics: taking students into your office; teaching and learning styles; interacting with your medical student; providing feedback; the One-Minute Preceptor; teaching the “Clinical Competencies;” and evaluating your student.

Instructional Strategies

Beyond Lecturing

Using the “Speed Dating” Model to Enhance Student Learning (Hodes, Faculty Focus)

Discusses the benefits of using discussion within student pairs instead of panel discussions to enhance learning in a large classroom setting.

Active and Cooperative Learning in The College Classroom (Paulson & Faust, California State University)

Defines active learning as “anything that students do in a classroom other than merely passively listening to an instructor’s lecture”. Offers and describes numerous active learning techniques which are categorized as: Individual Exercises, Questions & Answers, Immediate Feedback, Critical Thinking, Share/Pair, and Cooperative Learning.

Alternative Modes of Teaching and Learning University of Western Australia – Centre for Staff Development. Offers menu-based access to brief descriptions and examples of active (alternative) modes of learning. Modes include critical pedagogy, discovery learning, case-studies, problem-based learning, project-based learning, experiential learning, simulated experience, apprenticeship, service learning, action learning, coaching, mentoring, portfolios, reflective journals, collaborative/cooperative/group-based learning, peer teaching, independent study, learning contracts, and self-directed learning.

Strategies/Techniques for Activating Learning, Gauging Progress & Providing Feedback During Learning Activities (University of New Mexico, School of Medicine, Office of Teacher and Educational Development)

An excellent resource that provides a suggested list of strategies and techniques for engaging students. Also includes a detailed description of each technique, required preparation, and suggestions for assessment.

Alternative Modes of Teaching and Learning (University of Western Australia,  Centre for Staff Development)

Features brief descriptions and examples of active (alternative) modes of learning, which include critical pedagogy, discovery learning, case-studies, problem-based learning, project-based learning, experiential learning, simulated experience, apprenticeship, service learning, action learning, coaching, mentoring, portfolios, reflective journals, collaborative/cooperative/group-based learning, peer teaching, independent study, learning contracts, and self-directed learning.

Making Active Learning Work (University of Minnesota, Center for Teaching and Learning)

Six-part online tutorial defines active learning and describes active learning methods. Using video scenarios, provides an in-depth discussion of the common problems instructors face when implementing active learning strategies along with recommendations for success implementation of these strategies.

Critical Thinking (Walker Center for Teaching and Learning, University of Tennessee, Chattanooga)

Defines and describes critical thinking, discusses the benefits of incorporating critical thinking activities in the classroom, and offers teaching strategies to help promote critical thinking.

Navigating the Bumpy Road to Student-Centered Instruction (Felder & Brent)

An interesting article in which the authors address faculty concerns about student-centered instruction

Keeping Introverts in Mind in Your Active Learning Classroom (Monahan, Faculty Focus)

Offers tips for encouraging the participation of all students in active learning activities, including students who are shy or quiet, in an effort to maximize learning for every learner

Five Characteristics of Learner-Centered Teaching (Weimer, Faculty Focus)

Describes five essential characteristics of an effective learner-centered higher education classroom

GO FAR! Teaching Skills Handbook (University of New Mexico, School of Medicine, Office of Teacher and Educational Development)

44-page handbook describes the GO FAR! approach in medical education. Emphasizes the use of Goal setting, writing Objectives, utilizing a teaching Framework, Assessment, and Revision of instruction as needed.

Teaching Strategies/Methodologies: Advantages, Disadvantages/Cautions, Keys to Success (University of New Mexico, School of Medicine, Office of Teacher and Educational Development)

This 4-part chart describes some of the most common instructional strategies, including case based learning, independent study, large group discussion, and lecture, corresponding advantages and disadvantages to each approach, and suggestions for effective use.

Case-Based Learning

Case Based Learning in Your Classes (Waterman & Stanley)

Features a short tutorial on using case-based learning and addresses the following topics: Types of Cases, Planning for Case Based Learning, Generating Ideas for Cases, Case Writing Suggestions and Assessing Case Learning.

Using Case Studies in the Classroom (Walker Center for Teaching and Learning, University of Tennessee, Chattanooga)

An easy-to-use resource that contained bulleted information on the following topics: Why use cases?; Underlying procedures for using cases; Case based process; What makes a good case?; Choosing and using a case; and Materials to use for case. Includes a few selected references supporting the use of cases in the classroom.

Case Writing Guide (Lane, Penn State, Schreyer Institute for Teaching Excellence)

Offers a 6-step guide to developing, organizing and presenting information in the case format.

Quick Tips for Case Writing (Lane, Penn State, Schreyer Institute for Teaching Excellence)

Provides six tips to help you get started on using cases.

Teaching with the Case Method (Indiana University Teaching Handbook)

Discusses case formats, managing a case assignment, designing case study questions, and managing discussion and debate effectively.

Department of Pathology Cases (University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Department of Pathology)

A large searchable database of cases covering the following areas of pathology: Autopsy, Cardiovascular, Clinical Chemistry & Immunology, Clinical Microbiology, Dermatology, Endocrine Pathology, ENT, Gastrointestinal, Genitourinary, Gynecologic, Hematopathology, Neuropathology, Pediatric Pathology, Pulmonary, Skeletal/Soft Tissue, Transfusion Medicine and Transplant Pathology.

Case Studies (University of Missouri School of Health Professions)

A large collection of interdisciplinary cases. Examples include breast cancer, CHF, Diabetes, Guillain Barré, Mechanical Low Back Pain, Osteoarthritis and Exercise, Post-Polio Syndrome, Special Needs Child, and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

Facilitating Learning in a Small Group (University of New Mexico, School of Medicine, Office of Teacher and Educational Development)

This one-page resource offers tips for establishing and maintaining a safe and learning-centered environment, managing the group process, and using questions effectively.

Cooperative Learning

Cooperative Learning is defined as: “an instructional strategy that employs a variety of motivational techniques to make instruction more relevant and students more responsible” (Panitz)

New Evidence on Cooperative Learning (Weimer, Faculty Focus)

Discusses new (2013) research that examines students’ time on task during cooperative learning activities

Doing Collaborative Learning (National Institute for Science Education)

Focuses on the ‘practical’ side of implementing collaborative learning (CL), i.e., ways to make it work in the classroom. Addresses course structure and objectives, creating goals, and helping student ‘buy into’ the method. Also covers evaluation issues, creating groups, student/faculty roles, and some ideas on group dynamics.

Cooperative Learning (University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Teaching Resource Center)

Helpful and concise resource that defines cooperative learning (CL) and describes its positive impact on student learning. Includes descriptions several CL techniques, including the three-step interview, roundtable, focused listing, structured problem-solving, paired annotations, value line, entry journal and guided reciprocal peer questioning.

Doing Collaborative Learning (National Institute for Science Education)

A good resource for instructors who are interested in or have begun implementing cooperative learning in their courses. Information is organized in short tutorials with the headings: “Doing CL”, “Course Structure”, “Groups”, “Lectures”, and “CL Structures”. The “CL Structures” section defines many CL techniques and offers suggestions for implementation.

Effective Strategies for Cooperative Learning. Felder, RM & Brent, R. Provides tips on forming teams, dealing with dysfunctional teams, grading team assignments, and using cooperative learning in a distance learning environment. PDF File.

Benefits of Cooperative Learning in Relation to Student Motivation (Panitz)

A book chapter that outlines the benefits of cooperative learning in terms of its motivational impact

Changing a Course from Lecture Format to Cooperative Learning (McManus, University of Washington) Personal account of a professor who converted her science course (oceanography) from a traditional lecture mode to a cooperative learning approach. Includes tips on course structure, variations, and grading. Discusses common challenges faced by an instructor when implementing a cooperative learning structure and offers tips for navigating such situations.

Commonly Asked Questions about Teaching Collaborative Activities (Penn State, Schreyer Institute for Teaching Excellence, Excerpt from Chapter II of the Penn State Teacher II)

Provides practical answers to common questions instructors ask regarding the use of collaborative activities for teaching, such as “How do I decide which assignments/activities to make collaborative?”, “How do I divide students into groups?”, and “How do I grade collaborative work?”

Peer Ratings in Cooperative Learning Teams (Kaufman, Felder,& Fuller, North Carolina State University)

Examines the validity of concerns about using peer ratings in cooperative learning teams.

Curriculum Design and Syllabus Development

Concept Mapping and Curriculum Design (Walker Center for Teaching and Learning, University of Tennessee, Chattanooga)

Defines concept mapping, describes the benefits of utilizing a concept map as a planning device for instruction, and provides steps for creating a concept map.

Instructional Design Lessons (Virginia Tech, Department of Teaching and Learning)

Features 10 lessons that address key aspects of instructional design: Lesson 1 – Overview of Design; Lesson 2 – Needs Assessment; Lesson 3 – Instructional Analysis, pt. 1; Lesson 4 – Instructional Analysis, pt. 2; Lesson 5 – Learner and Context Analysis; Lesson 6 – Writing Objectives; Lesson 7 – Assessment Instruments; Lesson 8 – Instructional Strategy; Lesson 9 – Development; Lesson 10 – Formative Evaluation.

Teaching Tips – Learning-Centered Syllabi Workshop (Haugen, Iowa State University, Center for Teaching Excellence)

An online ‘workshop’ designed to assist faculty in constructing learning-centered syllabi. According to the authors, a learning-centered syllabus requires that you shift from what you, the instructor, are going to cover in your course to a concern for what information and tools you can provide for your students to promote learning and intellectual development. Includes a good set of references.

Delivering Engaging Lectures

Lecturer’s Guide to Preparing and Delivering Excellent Lectures (University of New Mexico, School of Medicine, Office of Teacher and Educational Development)

Handy tri-fold brochure provides a guide for constructing an effective and engaging lecture, from preparation through reflection. Also features tips on using audio-visuals effectively, a lecturing checklist, and suggestions for closure of a lecture.

Strategies for Increasing Active Learning in Large Group Settings and Giving Effective Lectures/Presentations  (University of New Mexico, School of Medicine, Office of Teacher and Educational Development)

Describes best practices for the lecture method, presentational strategies, and strategies for increasing active learning.

Designing Smart Lectures (University of Minnesota, Center for Teaching and Learning)

Features a well-organized tutorial designed to help faculty plan and deliver lectures that actively engage students. Offers guides for planning, delivering, and evaluating lectures, as well as two sets of videos that show effective lecturing in large classroom settings

Dynamic Lectures (Madigan Army Medical Center, Faculty Development Resource Center) Outlines essential preparation elements of a formal large group presentation, illustrates useful tips regarding audiovisual aids, and discusses the principles of effective speaking

Lecturing (McInnis, Centre for the Study of Higher Education)

Summarizes research on effective lecturing, identifies characteristics of effective and ineffective lecturing, offers tips for engaging students as active learners and effective use of handouts and audiovisual aids, and emphasizes the importance of evaluation for improvement

Student Complaints about Lectures (Berkeley University of California, Center for Teaching and Learning)

Bulleted list summarizes results from a non-scientific survey. Although these results were collected from students at Berkeley University, they represent common student complaints about traditional lecturing.

How to Make Your Speaking Easier and More Effective (Berkeley University of California, Center for Teaching and Learning)

Offers tips for lecturers and public speakers

From Teaching to Learning: Part III. Lectures and Approaches to Active Learning (Seeler Turnwald & Bull, Journal of Veterinary Medical Education)

Provides suggestions on improving lectures, asking questions that increase student participation, brainstorming and assessment

Problem-Based Learning

Problem Based Learning Curriculum at RowanSOM

Provides an overview of Problem Based Learning (PBL) at RowanSOM, a brief description of PBL, and online calendars

Introduction to Problem-Based Learning (Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy)

A large collection of resources on problem-based learning (PBL)

Problem-Based Learning, Especially in the Context of Large Classes (Woods, McMaster University)

Defines and clarifies the concept of Problem-Based Learning (PBL), related PBL to the process of problem-solving, and describes use of small group, self-directed PBL at McMaster University. Includes links to the full-text (PDF files) of Don Wood’s book Problem-based Learning: Helping your students gain the most from PBL (1995).

A Comparison Between Three Modes of Instruction (Baylor College of Medicine)

Tables compares Team Based Learning, Problem Based Learning and traditional lecturing.

Teaching in Laboratory Settings

Teaching Labs More Effectively (Michigan State University)

Features a short article on the importance of student laboratory experiences and tips for enhancing excellent lab instruction. Includes a reference list.

Laboratory Teaching (University of Virginia – Teaching Resource Center)

Offers an excellent overview of the key processes and methods involved in providing quality laboratory instruction, including preparation, in-lab activity, lab lectures, supervising students’ work, using visual aids and summarizing the experience

Science Labs (Indiana University, Teaching Handbook)

Provides suggestions for maximizing the effectiveness of science labs. Topics include: preparing lab sections; managing laboratory sections; safety procedures; student preparation and supervising the experiment. Also emphasizes the need to refrain from giving outright answers or advice.

Teaching in Large Group Settings

Strategies for Increasing Active Learning in Large Group Settings and Giving Effective Lectures/Presentations  (University of New Mexico, School of Medicine, Office of Teacher and Educational Development)

Describes best practices for the lecture method, presentational strategies, and strategies for increasing active learning.

Beating the Numbers Game (Felder)

Suggests techniques to get students actively involved in a large class setting

Teaching Large Groups (Cantillon, British Medical Journal)

Full text of this BMJ journal article. Offers practical tips on planning lectures, choosing teaching media, encouraging students to interact, and ways to end and evaluate your lecture. From the ABC of Learning and Teaching in Medicine series.

Large Lecture Classes (Berkeley University of California, Center for Teaching and Learning)

Offers six practical ways to make lectures in a large enrollment course more manageable and effective

Team-Based Learning

Team Learning in Medical School (Baylor College of Medicine)

Overview of Team Learning in the medical education setting and compares/contrasts with Problem Based Learning

A Comparison Between Three Modes of Instruction (Baylor College of Medicine)

Table compares Team Based Learning, Problem Based Learning and traditional lecturing.

Team Based Learning Videos (Team-Based Learning Collaborative)

A collection of 73 short videos that address a wide variety of topics related to TBL, organized into subcategories such as “What is TBL?”, “What do TBL Students Say?”, “What do TBL Instructors Say?”, “TBL Components” and a variety of Webinar series.

Technology and Online Learning

Lydia Online Training

Excellent resource offers 2,500+ video-based e-learning courses on Adobe and Microsoft applications and technologies; web design; digital photography, video and audio; Mac applications; programming, and more.

Turning Point Technologies (clickers) Training Tutorials and Help

Turning Point Quick Start Guide

Tips for Using Clickers Effectively (University of New Mexico, School of Medicine, Office of Teacher and Educational Development)

Suggests ways to incorporate Clickers in lectures. Provides example “Clicker Questions” and discusses how these questions are used during instruction.

Preparing a Power Point Presentation (University of New Mexico, School of Medicine, Office of Teacher and Educational Development)

This one-page PDF file includes an outline of tips for making Power Point presentations engaging and effective

Improving Your Power Point Design with One Simple Rule (Faculty Focus)

Offers tips for creating engaging and effective Power Point presentations. Tips include removing bullet points, including images, and adding audience surveys.

Teaching in the Cloud: Leveraging Online Collaboration Tools to Enhance Student Engagement (Hershock & LaVaque-Manty, University of Michigan, Center for Research on Teaching and Learning)

Discusses the positive effects of online collaboration on student learning and describes ways in which faculty can incorporate online collaborative learning in their courses.

Using Questioning and Discussion

Getting Them To Speak Up!  Questioning Skills to Promote Discussion in the Classroom (University of Tennessee, Chattanooga, Walker Center for Teaching and Learning)

Offers tips for asking questions in the classroom to facilitate discussion and to get students to think critically

Socratic Questioning (Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine)

Offers a 2-page guide on how to utilize Socratic Questioning to challenge accuracy and completeness of thinking

Discussion (Indiana University, Teaching Handbook)

An excellent brief overview of the key aspects of successful discussions in the classroom. Includes useful tips on preparing for and facilitating discussions. Also offers suggestions for handling common barriers that impede classroom discussions.

Better Questions are the Answer (Faculty Focus)

Discusses the importance of effective questioning as well as the appropriate use of various types of questions.

Teaching Guide: Leading Class Discussions (Colorado State University Writing Center)

Comprehensive web guide designed to help faculty develop strategies for running successful class discussions. Topics include: Teacher’s Role as Facilitator, Focusing Discussions, Thinking on the Spot, and Checking for Understanding. Also provides a sample discussion plan.

Socratic Questions (Changingminds.org)

Provides a brief overview of Socratic questioning and describes types of questions and their purpose. Offers many question prompts.

Questioning Skills to Engage Students (Sockalingam, Faculty Focus)

Challenges the traditional use of questioning within higher education settings and describes ways in which questioning can be used to tap students’ higher level thinking.

Student Evaluation and Assessment

Group Test-Taking Options to Consider (Weimer, Faculty Focus)
Discusses benefits and challenges associated with group or collaborative assessments.

Evaluating Group Projects (Walker Center for Teaching and Learning, University of Tennessee, Chattanooga)

Offers tips for planning group projects, establishing group rules and norms, techniques for evaluating group projects and example forms.

Item Writing Strategies for Medical Educators (NBOME)

Writing Multiple Choice Questions that Demand Critical Thinking (University of Oregon, Teaching Effectiveness Program)
Offers many practical suggestions for writing effective exam items plus a detailed set of techniques for writing several different types of multiple-choice questions that demand higher order thinking, with examples of each.

 Classroom Assessment Strategies (Walker Center for Teaching and Learning, University of Tennessee, Chattanooga)

Disputes myths about classroom assessment, discusses and categorizes assessment techniques, and offers suggestions for designing test questions.

Assessment Methods (University of New Mexico, School of Medicine, Office of Teacher and Educational Development)

Easy-to-use chart includes 12 assessment methods with corresponding a description, Fink’s Taxonomy domain(s), and potential advantages and disadvantages. Assessment methods included are: Computer Based Testing, direct observation, essay, Global Rating Scale, In-Basket, modified essay question, multiple choice questions, peer evaluation, practice or performance assessment, oral/verbal questioning, self assessment and Triple Jump.

Improving Multiple Choice Questions (IDEA Center, Clegg & Cashin, Kansas State University, Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development)
A clear and concise overview of the advantages and disadvantages of multiple choice test items as well as a step-by-step guide for item construction.

Evaluating Collaborative Coursework (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Center for Teaching and Learning)
Describes guidelines and assessment tools for evaluating group projects.

Writing Multiple Choice Questions that Demand Critical Thinking (University of Oregon, Teaching Effectiveness Program)
Offers many practical tips for writing effective test items as well as techniques for writing different types of multiple-choice questions that require higher order thinking with corresponding examples.

Constructing Written Test Questions for the Basic and Clinical Sciences (National Board of Medical Examiners)
As described by the authors, “This manual was written to help faculty members improve the quality of the multiple-choice questions written for their examinations.” Offers an overview of item formats, issues related to technical item flaws and item content, and suggestions on assessing item quality after test administration.

Best Practices for Designing and Grading Exams (Piontek, University of Michigan, Center for Research on Teaching and Learning)

Provides a guidelines for developing valid and reliable exams, discusses advantages and disadvantages of commonly used test items, offers item stems for assessing reasoning skills, and identifies key issues related to grading: holistic and trait-analytic rubrics, and normative and criterion grading systems.

Developing an Assessment Plan (University of Texas at Austin, Instructional Assessment Resources)

Offers planning steps for creating an assessment plan, a detailed description of how you will conduct your assessment. Also, offers an example, found here.

Preferred Multiple Choice Questions (University of Texas at Austin, Instructional Assessment Resources)

Offers examples of multiple choice questions which have been revised with corresponding justifications for these revisions

Student Support

Academic Integrity

Handing Academic Dishonesty (University of Tennessee, Chattanooga, Walker Center for Teaching and Learning)

Promoting Academic Integrity in the Classroom (Meizlish, University of Michigan, Center for Research on Teaching and Learning)

Provides a brief overview of related research and describes instructional and institutional practices that promote academic integrity

Diversity

Making Accommodations for Students with Disabilities: A Guide for Faculty and Graduate Student Instructors (Bierwert, University of Michigan, Center for Research on Teaching and Learning)

Offers “need to know” information for working with students with disabilities, including suggestions for structuring teaching, ways to provide support and resources for faculty.

Student Learning Styles

How People Learn (University of New Mexico, School of Medicine, Office of Teacher and Educational Development)

Brief resource that provides tips on “teaching for learning”

Student Learning Styles and Their Implications for Teaching (Montgomery & Groat, University of Michigan, Center for Research on Teaching and Learning)
Makes the case that all faculty members, regardless of discipline, can improve their teaching by understanding student learning styles.

Student Note-Taking

Research on Student Notetaking: Implications for Faculty and Graduate Student Instructors (DeZure, Kaplan & Deerman, University of Michigan, Center for Research on Teaching and Learning)

Discusses the impact of student notetaking and how the review of notes affects student learning. Also explores the role that instructors play, suggesting several specific strategies to support students.

Tips for Developing Students’ Note-taking Skills (Weimer, Teaching Professor Blog, Faculty Focus)

Shares evidence for why students should take notes during lectures. Offers suggestions on ways that instructors can demonstrate the value of having good notes and work with students on developing better note-taking skills.

Professional Resources

Using Adobe Acrobat for Electronic Portfolio Development (Barrett, University of Alaska Anchorage)

Describes the process for creating and maintaining an Electronic Portfolio

The Teaching Portfolio (Kaplan, University of Michigan, Center for Research on Teaching and Learning)
Discusses the purpose of the teaching portfolio, as well as a course portfolio, and provides suggestions for how portfolios can be used effectively.

Developing a Philosophy of Teaching Statement (Faculty Focus)

Well organized 20-page PDF guide offers articles that provide “how to” information on how to write a Philosophy of Teaching statement as well as several examples

Medical Education Conferences (Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine)

Offers a list of medical education conferences along with a description of the intended audience, hosting organization, and approximate dates

How to Make Your Speaking Easier and More Effective (Berkeley University of California, Center for Teaching and Learning)

Offers tips for lecturers and public speakers

Designing a Teaching Portfolio (Penn State, Schreyer Institute for Teaching Excellence)

Describes the process of developing a teaching portfolio, including the planning, shaping, organizing, and refining phases.

If you’ve got it flaunt it: Uses and abuses of teaching portfolios (Felder & Brent)

Offers a short but informative set of questions & answers on the teaching portfolio. Includes a rationale for the philosophy statement as well as tips for the design and evaluation of teaching portfolios

Recommended Portfolio Contents (Iowa State University, Center for Teaching Excellence)

Includes a list of the many types of information that could be included or summarized in your teaching portfolio

Teaching Portfolio (University of California, Career Center)

Describes the typical elements that are included in a teaching portfolio, including a teaching philosophy statement, a list of courses taught and sample syllabi, teaching evaluations, and letters of recommendation. Also briefly mentions the use of YouTube as evidence in support of effective teaching.

Teaching Portfolio (University of Iowa College of Medicine, Office of Consultation and Research in Medical Education) Describes the teaching portfolio concept; explains how faculty members can develop teaching portfolios; and provides examples of key sections of portfolios and resources

Writing a Teaching Philosophy Statement (Iowa State University, Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching)

In this video, an associate professor shares her experience in developing her own teaching philosophy statement as well as tips for the beginner writing for the first time

Resources for New Faculty

Writing the Syllabus (RowanSOM CTL)

Power Point presentation provides an overview on the purpose of a syllabus as well as items to include on a syllabus

RowanSOM Syllabus Template

Planning a Class Session: A Guide for New Teachers (Enerson, Plank & Johnson, Penn State, Schreyer Institute for Teaching Excellence)

Features an online tutorial intended for new faculty that focuses on the process underlying effective class planning. The emphasis throughout is on critical questions that underlie effective teaching, such as planning, setting goals, and assessing what you have done. Sections include: Getting the Big Picture; Filling in the Details and Gauging Your Progress.

Resources at Rowan

Information and Links for RowanSOM Faculty Members

Rowan Faculty Handbook

SOM-IST, Instructional Support Services

SOM Health Sciences Library

Continuing Medical Education

 

 

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