Molecular Biology

Faculty

  • Caradonna

    Sal J. Caradonna, PhD

    Professor and Chair
    Science Center 120
    caradonn@rowan.edu
    856 566-6056

    My laboratory is interested in the post-translational mechanisms that regulate the proteins involved in base-excision repair of DNA. We are studying the aberrant pathways that lead to uracil misincorporation into DNA as well as the regulated cytosine deamination pathways of the APOBEC family of cytosine deaminases.

  • Biswas

    Subhasis Biswas, PhD

    Professor
    Science Center 306A
    856 566-6270
    biswassb@rowan.edu

    Our laboratory is interested in dissecting the mechanisms of DNA replication in prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems with goals of developing novel anti-microbials and anti-proliferation drugs.

  • Katrina Cooper, PhD

    Katrina Cooper, PhD

    Assistant Professor
    Science Center, Room 362
    856 566-2887
    cooperka@rowan.edu

    Following stress cells have to orchestrate a myriad of responses to survive or die. Incorrect choices can led to deleterious outcomes, e.g. tumor formation. To study this, we use S. cerevisiae, human cells and mouse models. We focus on the conserved cyclin C protein that is destroyed in response to stress. Our working hypothesis is that cyclin C is a novel stress related tumor suppressor.

  • Katrina Cooper, PhD

    Renée M. Demarest, PhD

    Assistant Professor
    856 566-6402
    Science Center 276
    demarest@rowan.edu

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a neoplastic disorder of lymphoblasts that are committed to the B-cell lineage (B-ALL) or the T-cell lineage (T-ALL).  Five-year survival rates (FSR) for children and adolescents with this disease are 75–85%, whereas, adult T-ALL patients have a 35–40% FSR.  T-ALL patients have essentially the same FSR of patients with B-ALL.  However, certain aspects about T-ALL make it a more aggressive disease with a poorer clinical outcome than B-ALL.

  • Ronald Ellis, PhD

    Ronald Ellis, PhD

    Professor
    Science Center 316
    856 566-2768
    Fax: 856 566-6291
    ron.ellis@rowan.edu

    Control of Germ Cell Fate: Animals must produce sperm or eggs to reproduce. Although these cell types differ dramatically, they are produced from similar progenitors. Understanding how this process is controlled could revolutionize our ability to treat reproductive disorders and infertility in humans. Evolution of Hermaphroditism: Sexual traits are among the most rapidly changing features of each species. To learn how these changes take place, and how developmental pathways constrain which ones occur, we are studying the evolution of mating systems in nematodes.

  • Jennifer Fischer, PhD

    Jennifer Fischer, PhD

    Assistant Professor
    Science Center 128
    856 566-6919
    fischeje@rowan.edu

    Medical schools employ a variety of curricula to educate students to be competent physicians. Currently we are evaluating the role and value of biomedical knowledge in clinical reasoning and diagnosing by obtaining feedback from practicing physicians. I also focus on understanding and utilizing educational technologies such as exam software, online learning management systems and virtual programs to enhance student learning.

  • Gary S. Goldberg, PhD

    Gary S. Goldberg, PhD

    Associate Professor
    Science Center B307
    856 566-6718
    gary.goldberg@rowan.edu

    Cells must communicate with each other to coordinate the development and survival of an animal. This communication can be mediated by diffusible factors that pass between cells, or by direct contact through cell junctions. I am interested in how intercellular communication affects cell growth and differentiation, with an emphasis on how cell communication can control tumor cell growth and prevent eye diseases.

  • Michael Henry, PhD

    Michael Henry, PhD

    Assistant Professor
    Science Center 320
    856 566-6970
    henrymf@rowan.edu

    We use the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system to understand the molecular mechanisms by which RNA precursors are processed in the nucleus. More precisely, our goal is to understand the role of posttranslational protein modification in this process.

  • Michael Law, PhD

    Michael Law, PhD

    Instructor
    Science Center, Room 122
    856-566-6266
    lawmj@rowan.edu

    My research is focused on understanding how transcriptional control regulates cell fate decisions. Cells that are presented with an environmental challenge must respond in a manner that is appropriate for the stimulus. Using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, my work focuses on post-translational histone modifications during metabolic challenge and differentiation.

  • Kai Mon Lee, PhD

    Kai Mon Lee, PhD

    Associate Professor
    University Doctors Pavilion, 2214
    856 566-6152
    klee@rowan.edu

    A novel approach to the study of globin gene switching:
    • Translational control
    • Structural features that modulate efficiency of translation of mRNA
    • Apoptosis in leukemia cells and its application to cancer therapy
    • Organizational of chromosomes in the nucleus (in collaboration with Dr. R. Nagele)
  • Eric Moss, PhD

    Eric Moss, PhD

    Associate Professor
    Science Center 312
    856 566-2896
    mosseg@rowan.edu

    We study developmental timing, microRNAs and translational control in C. elegans and the mouse. The worm heterochronic gene lin-28 is regulated by microRNAs and encodes a specific mRNA-binding protein. Its human homologue, Lin28, appears also to be a microRNA-controlled developmental regulator.

  • Susan Muller-Weeks, PhD

    Susan Muller-Weeks, PhD

    Assistant Professor
    Science Center 130
    856 566-6097
    muller@rowan.edu

    Research in the laboratory focuses on the repair of uracil in DNA, which is critical for the maintenance of genomic integrity. Specifically we are elucidating transcriptional and post-translational pathways that regulate expression of uracil-DNA glycosylase under normal cellular conditions and in response to anti-tumor agents.

  • Catherine L. Neary, PhD

    Catherine L. Neary, PhD

    Instructor
    Science Centery
    856 566-6373
    nearycl@rowan.edu


    Hexokinase II (HK2), which catalyzes the first committed step of glycolysis, is overexpressed in many cancers. When inhibited, HK2 translocates from the mitochondria to the nucleus. I am investigating the signaling pathways that mediate HK2 mitochondrial association and nuclear translocation.

  • John G. Pastorino, PhD

    John G. Pastorino, PhD

    Associate Professor

    856 566-6041
    pastorjg@rowan.edu


    Our work identifies distinctions in mitochondrial function between normal and cancerous cells for the potential discovery of novel chemotherapeutic targets that can be exploited to selectively induce cytotoxicity in cancer cells. Mitochondrial injury is also central to number of disease states.

  • Randy Strich, PhD

    Randy Strich, PhD

    Associate Professor
    Science Center 354
    856-566-6043
    strichra@rowan.edu

    Our laboratory focuses on understanding how the transcription program is coupled to meiotic progression in budding yeast. A second project investigates the activity of the conserved C-type cyclin in directing the oxidative stress response and apoptosis in yeast and mammalian systems.

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